click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
face as their teaching workforce is graying. economics correspondent paul solman was back on campus, part of his on-going reporting, "making sense of financial news." >> when my doctor or my wife tells me i ought to stop, i will stop. >> solman: 75-year-old former george washington university president stephen trachtenberg still teaches public service there. >> you guys are all working well togetherm and that's wonderful. >> solman: at george mason university, 71-year-old writing professor don gallehr is still teaching too. >> if the kids are happy and learning and i'm happy and learning, i'm here. >> solman: and how long does 69- year-old boston university particle physicist larry sulak plan to keep blowing up protons? >> i have no idea. shelly is a good model. >> solman: that would be his 80- year-old colleague, nobel- winning physicist sheldon glashow. and when do you intend to retire? >> that i don't know. >> solman: america's work force is graying, and academia along with it. professors over 65 have more than doubled since 2000. some 40% of all workers say they'll work past 65.
with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registrati
a government shutdown, we update the short- and long-term budget battles. >> sreenivasan: paul solman looks at free trade through the eyes of a classic american brand, getting wet in the global market. >> i know that every surfboard that comes into america comes in duty free. and when i sell a surfboard to australia, japan, europe, its a 20% to 25% duty that they have to pay to get mine. >> brown: we continue our series on how broadband technoly is changing our lives. tonight, a look at chattanooga, tennessee-- home of the nation's fastest internet connections. >> sreenivasan: and, spencer michaels has the story of photo journalists who risked their lives to tell the stories of iraqis in the early days of the war. >> as photographers, we're always looking for ways to communicate the urgency of horrible drama in these situations. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, a
: next, surf's up for "newshour" economics correspondent paul solman. his subject tonight: how the monster waves of international trade and globalization threaten-- yes-- the surfboard industry here in the u.s. it's part of paul's on-going reporting "making sense of financial news." >> that's steve and barrie boehne, they're the leading force in tandem. look at the grace. >> reporter: now what, you may ask, could a surfing star of the 1970s have to do with economics in 2013? >> isn't that great! >> reporter: well, steve boehne's life in the surf, which began at age 12 here in dana point, california, has involved shredding the waves, since 1958, on boards of his own invention. he's the founder and still maker and seller of legendary high end infinity surfboards. >> paul, you can use my board any time. >> reporter: even if his heavy lifting days are over. isn't this kind of a large surfboard? >> yeah, this is bigger than normal. it's a standup surfboard. it's become popular in the last five years. and a lot of the older guys really embraced it at first, because it's a little bit
this, we david. we heard, among other things, rand paul talking about a completely new position for him on immigration. what's going on? >> well, the immigration story is just good news for those of us who want a comprehensive solution. whether it's the-- what's happening on immigration is we failed probably seven, eight years ago, but now it's just moving. and so there's a groom of eight senators in the senate who are working together to come up with a bill, and they've overcome what used to be the main hurdle which is how-- what are we going to do with the 11 or 12 million who are here. they have more or less got that. now they are arguing how we get the long-term flow of. so suddenly you're seeing progress, and that's in the senate. in the house, you're seeing some private meetings where they are making progress there, too, which is actually a harder job under the aegis of leadership of both parties. i think it's quite likely what we couldn't do a couple of years ago we're going to do this time which is have a exrepsive immigration reform bill and fix the system. >> woodruff: and a b
. republican senator rand paul put his support behind comprehensive immigration reform today. during a speech at the u.s. hispanic chamber of commerce, the kentucky republican said the nation's 11 million illegal immigrants should have a legal way to stay in the u.s. >> we will find a place for you. this cause, however, those who work for reform must understand that a real solution must ensure our borders are secure. we must also treat those who are here already with understanding and compassion without also unduly rewarding them for coming illegally. >> sreenivasan: bipartisan efforts are under way in both the house and senate to overhaul u.s. immigration laws. today speaker of the house john boehner called the house version a "pretty reasonable solution." the number of americans dying from alzheimer's disease has increased by 68% in the last decade. according to the alzheimer's association, one in three seniors have some form of dementia when they die, and the disease accelerates the progression of other life- threatening conditions. because alzheimer's has no cure or treatment to slow symp
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)